Same same but different

Auf unserem Rückflug am Silvestervorabend haben wir noch auf dem Flughafen von Lissabon beschlossen, so schnell wie irgendmöglich auf die Insel zurück zu kehren. Dieses Mal mit unseren Bikekollegen. Uns war klar, dass es ein schwieriges Unterfangen sein würde, die Schneephilen auf’s Bike zu locken und das mitten in den Atlantik. Osttirol und Südtirol versanken zu diesem Zeitpunkt gerade meterhoch im Schnee, eifrig wurden Skier gewachst, Felle aufgezogen und nach unverspurten Schneehängen gejagt.

Erste Anlaufstation unsere Teammates, Fehlanzeige! Mit oder ohne Schnee gehe der Winter bis April, die ernüchternde Antwort. Aber was wäre ein Kartenspiel ohne Joker, blond, blauäugig und Hansdampf auf jeglichem Trail, Markus. Zum einen kam der andere, mit Ende der ersten Januarwoche stand dann fest: 6 BikerInnen wagen die Winterflucht.

Madeira_2014_142_web

Die Jungs von Freeride Madeira kontaktiert haben wir mit einem Kurzfilmprojekt und einer Supertrailstory im Gepäck dann auf unseren Abflug Mitte Februar gewartet. Wir haben viel versprochen, die anderen haben viel erwartet. Wie es war, ob die Erwartungen erfüllt wurden in den unparteiischen Worten des Hills2rider:

Freeride Madeira, Jungle Biking and Island Atmosphere. Eight days of shuttling, one day pedaling and never ending trails. From smooth lines with berms and jumps over wet rock gardens with lots of speed to very technical and exposed vertride sections everything was present. The quality of the trails varied from amazing to totally insane! The terrain: Wide open ridges, deepest jungle and steep cliffs straight into the sea. The Crew consisted of:

  • Axel: Male Vertriders Superstar, German roots, Tyrolean of choice for more than ten years.
  • Gordon: Inofficial Austrian Masters Downhill Champion, German roots, Tyrolean of choice for more than ten years.
  • Martin: Fast and nearly undestructable (Angie excluded), German roots, accepted as Tyrolean since the Discovery of America.
  • Sylvia: Female Vertriders Superstar, Southtyrolean, which means Italian ;-)
  • Irene: Austrias future Enduro hope, Upperaustrian, maybe Tyrolean of choice soon.
  • and me: Blond, blue eyed, trailaddicted, Upperaustrian, Tyrolean of choice for less than ten years.

We were sleeping in Villa “O Lugarinho” with a quite cold, but frequently visited outdoor pool.

Starting from here the Guides of Freeride Madeira (John, Roberto and Nulo) showed us the Trails on the whole Island. Day one was the first of in a whole 8 Trailfireworks. The initial diffidence, because of more than three months bike abstinence was gone quite fast, and we soon started flying (note: without crashing) over several gaps (keyword: AxelAir). After four runs and lots of ‘Juchezer’ we rode Axel’s Madeirian Signature Trail, which he checked out two months ago. A steep, slippery, quite exposed vertride path leading directly into the roaring waves of the ocean. What a day!! The following days weren’t less amazing, here is a short summary: typical Madeirian jungle trails, descents through five vegetations zones, endless riding, ridge riding, stunning sunsets, icredibile descents form the highest peaks, MEGATRAIL, slippery stairs :-) , talking bullshit, drinking beer, eating Espetada and Tuna Steaks. Did I mention the insane Trails??

The days were long, we only once reached our Villa before sunset. The Guides did a really good Job, sometimes till the middle of the night! Except from the Trails they introduced us to Espetada and Poncha. The first one, Espetada, is a typical Madeirian dish made usually of large chunks of beef rubbed in garlic and salt, skewered onto a bay leaf stick cooked over hot coals or wood chips. In our ten days on the island, it was our main dish for sure. Poncha is a traditional alcoholic drink made with Aguardente de cana, honey, sugar, lemon and orange juice. Maybe the Poncha was the reason that we all lost against a women in table soccer one evening in a small bar. The other explanation could be, that she was the eight best female table soccer player in the world…
I say thanks to our guides from Freeride Madeira, thanks to the crew for making breakfast (getting out of the bed is definitely not my strength) and thanks to Axel and Sylvia for organizing this rememberable holiday. It was a really nice winter break and calls for a repeat! I can recommend Madeira to every Biker out there, just pure fun trail riding! With this in mind my last to words, which in my opinion describe our feelings on the Madeirian trails quite well: BADA BING!!!

We’ll be back again and again, Sylvia.

More pictures to come!

Trotz Holzinsel keine Holzwege

Beim Ausgang am Flughafen wusste ich schon, ein erster Atemzug in der milden Luft, alles wird gut. Wir waren kurz nach Sonnenuntergang auf der portugiesischen Insel Madeira mitten im Atlantik gelandet. Weihnachtsurlaub mit Familie, aber die Bikes mussten trotzdem irgendwie mit. Zumindest zum Auskundschaften. Ich hatte zwar schon von Mountainbiketouren auf der Insel gehört, aber für echten Bike-Urlaub ist eher La Palma bekannt. Ob Madeira also wirklich zum lässigen Biken oder gar Vertriden taugt? Um dem Glück etwas nachzuhelfen hatte ich John von Freeride Madeira kontaktiert, vielleicht könnte er uns etwas herumführen und die Locations zeigen. Ja, könne er.

Als Nächstes Ankunft in der Pension, wo wir die nächsten Tage wohnen sollen und wo Robert arbeitet. Ich komme mit Robert ins Gespräch über unsere Pläne, er horcht auf, als ich erwähne, daß wir unsere Bikes dabei haben. Robert kennt zwar die Vertrider noch nicht, aber sofort nimmt er sein Telefon in die Hand und ruft seinen Kollegen an, John. Der von Freeride Madeira. Wir waren also in besten Händen. Es wird gleich der übernächste Tag ausgemacht, wir werden vor der Pension abgeholt, mit Kleinbus und Hänger für sechs Bikes, drei Downhill-Bikes sind schon geladen. Neben John sind dabei seine Kollegen Roberto und Luis. Aber damit unsere portugiesischen Freunde auch was davon haben, schreibe ich auf Englisch weiter.

So we were up for a first sampling of Madeiran dirt. John and Roberto had a fine menu of trails in mind and we sampled the light starter on the rough central altiplano of the island riding down towards the most north western point. The red earth on the trails winding down in between the macchia and ancient laurel forest, created a stunning surrounding. Further down, eucalyptus forest took over together with refreshing smells until the salty scents of the ocean rounded off a dish of trails with a wide variety, from smooth single track to rough downhill type riding to bermy and loathy forest tracks, steep enough at stages to make us happy.

We did a couple of shorter runs in all geographic directions, with endless sudden secret turnoffs into the bush that I would need a GPS record to find them again. And find them again definitely would be worth it. Just that GPS is for nerds and recording somebody else’s tracks is bad karma, so we’ll have to go with the locals again. The last trail of the day, however, I did remember and I would sure find by myself, too perfect the setting… a secret little hidden trail leads onto a cliff overlooking the waves rolling in below. And in the low evening sun us five set off down the side of the cliff, the topography suggesting a much steeper trail. A nice and steep section of steps and great riding later, we touched base exactly (ok, we still had to pedal 2 minutes) at a reggae bar by the sea. A soothing sound that after such a day wouldn’t have anything to mend. A hooray to sunsets, beer and oceans.

Talking to John, he told us a little how the whole Freeride Madeiria story began. Ten years ago, when mountain biking was still a total niche, some local downhill guys shuttled themselves and explored the tracks on the island. After a visit to the gigantic bikepark system of Portes Du Soleil in France they started thinking of more on their own home trails. In 2005 they bought a van with trailor and re-discovered some more old tracks with google-earth and cleaned them up. The first downhill races were organized and today about 70 racers compete in an annual Madeiran DH-cup with five races. Now, besides Freeride Madeira, several other companies offer guided tours and maintain trails, yet the real bike-tourism has remained illusive on the island. This is a little hard to comprehend, a wide selection of different style race-ready downhill tracks and the fact that some of the best Portuguese racers are from Madeira, speaks a clear language. Oh, and a first Enduro race was also held last December. So pretty damn close to gravity bikes’s paradise.

That said, how about our peculiar habit of vertriding? A big part of vertriding is about exploring new trails, and if possible a summit. You live only once so we went for the highest peak. Ok, the Pico Ruivo is at 1860 m not the Everest for Austrian standards and most of the way you can drive your car to a close parking and the trail to the summit is well renovated, even paved on some stretches, but the final 100 m are Vertrider terrain finally. No matter the trail, the view over the rugged Madeiran interior to the Atlantic on both sides would be worth it on its own. Coming down was fun but the big adventure started below the parking lot.

A Madeiran speciality are toboggans. Toboggans are vegetation covered gullies or wide channels, which could carry a lot of water after heavy rains. The tree and bush cover make for a tunnel like feeling. But the actual surprise is the dirt. The ground consists of a slimy slippery smooth reddish rock (Basalt rock? geologists anywhere?). Riding the slippery steep was a new chapter in my riding experience! Amongst the Tyrolian limestone, the Moab Slickrock, the Utah Dirt and the Canadian Cedar, the Madeirian Toboggan slimerock should have its own rank in the hall-of-fame of mountain bike tire surfaces. In any case, that particular Toboggan was in bad shape after the last heavy rains and it was a good and earnest effort negotiating the trail.

I had one more joker in my hand: A shear cliff on the far west coast. If the trail I found on the map was rideable and the teleferico would take us up again, I would sure have found what I was looking for, not only on that day, but in a more universal sense. So we went there to see just how universal. As it looked, the cable car guy is not permitted to take bikes, the trail being too dangerous anyways and bikes would be too large for the cable car, and hikers would not be amused…the old story. Anyways, I thought, first lets check out the trail, hiking back up is another story. Entering the trail verging to the north face of the cliff which is less vertical, it looks like the perfect terrain. The trail winding down from one little terrace to next one below. Nice steep and tight corners, semi-exposed, small bushes hide the view of downfall and disguise the exposure.

The trail traverses the face, the bikes speed up and jump on the links between the switchbacks. A natural step combination leads right to edge, a shady safety cable is in place. Not too hard to ride but you sure have to have some confidence in tight, steep cornering, or look at it like a little danger to remind you’re alive. The sun is reflected from the blue ocean below, the huge roaring waves from the northeast crashing on the black cobble beach creating a white interface. After sticking all lines, on the last few meters, the trail throws at you its final and biggest riddle in form of a very long sequence of artificial steps right towards the last ledge a few meters above the beach. I bailed out on the last steps as I was already aware of being alive…the raging ocean, the salty wind, some mild ray of the sun, everything is good. Cause that’s the trail, I thought! It’s the legendary Mezzocorona trail of the Atlantic.

And if you don’t want to hike up, you will have to convince the teleferico guy. Tell him about the grandeur of the trail that captures you, of the switchbacks that allows no other thoughts and clear your mind to make you smile again. Tell him how you can take your front wheel off in 5 seconds so that your bike fits easily. And tell him that when you see a hiker, you park your bike and lift your helmet to greet and catch your breath to let him past, after a little chat.

Finding the jewel of the Atlantic it was OK that the departure was imminent. And on the final riding day we had to see a huge line-up of the local downhill community. Robert had called upon the boys (and girls!) from his Clube Canico Riders, an enthusiastic group of local bikers. Three minibuses with trailors, John part of it again, comprised the crowd. New trails again, great riding again. Also because of Pedros ‘Pulga’ Silva. Pulga is one of the high potential Portuguese DH riders, entering elite next year and ready to rip the tracks apart. Riding with him showed me again what downhill is all about – simple speed and finding the fastest lines. His enthusiasm was totally contagious. Great fun and next time I’ll bring more suspension and heavier gear to the island (not that I can keep up then). John and Roberto also turned out not as just as the perfect guides but also as fast racy riders. And Robert, the mastermind and father figure of the Canico Riders had an impressive eye and the lens for some cover page shots. Thanks guys, for introducing us the trails for Madeira!

We’ll be back. Axel und das Team Vertriders.

Bewegte Bilder, Vertriders Edition

Ein Bild sagt mehr als tausend Worte, eine bewegte Bildsequenz kann noch mehr, sie kann unsere Reaktionen ohne Worte widerspiegeln. Das Online Mountainbike Magazin NSMB hat unsere Lachmuskeln mit dem Blogbeitrag MTB Reaction GIFs, The Whistler Edition Ende November derart trainiert, dass wir eine kleine Vertriders Edition davon rausbringen. Viel Spass! Euer Team Vertriders.

 ”Hey Axel, wir haben einen neuen Trail ausgecheckt … mit einer unfahrbaren Stelle.”

“Müsst’s ihr eigentlich überall fahren, ihr habt ja den Nordkette Singletrail.”

Beim Versuch auf dem Nordkette Singletrail an Benni und Gerhard dranzubleiben.

Kovacs springt beim Nordkette Downhill 2012 den Roadgap. (Sorry Christoph;)

Gardasee

Die Trails am Gardasee gehören mittlerweile zu den absoluten Mountainbike-Klassikern, einige sind fast schon Legende. Für viele Biker bietet die Gardasee-Region den Saisonsauftakt, jetzt Anfang November, ist der Hype des Frühlings und Sommers längst vorüber, auf den Gipfeln der Nordalpen liegt schon Schnee, es kehrt Ruhe ein. Für uns eine gute Gelegenheit, nach langer Zeit mal wieder die alten Klassiker zu besuchen. Besonders gespannt bin ich auf die zahlreichen Schlüsselstellen in den Bergflanken oberhalb von Limone. Nahe der Dalco Alm hatte ich vor fünf Jahren schon einmal aus Frust fast geweint, weil eine Stelle einfach nicht hergehen wollte…

Mit dabei: Eine kleine Delegation der Gemeinschaft außergewöhnlicher Mountainbike Sympathisanten (GAMS) – die Innsbrucker Ursteine -, sie hauchen dem Trip eine Brise Nostalgie ein. Die Gamsler sind zusammen mit den Vertridern wahrscheinlich eine der ersten Pioniere dort gewesen und kennen jeden Trail von ihrer ersten Stunde, aus Zeiten wo neongelbe Lycra-Leggins beim Biken der letzte Schrei waren. Sie kennen jede Schlüsselstelle mit ihrer Befahrungsgeschichte, wer, wann, wie versucht hat, welche Line zu fahren.

Manche Stellen haben sich mit der Zeit stark verändert, oft hat die Verwitterung das Geröll in der Ausfahrt weggewaschen, während die Kalkstein-Felsen standhaft blieben und die Lines dadurch steiler geworden sind. Oder bilde ich mir das nur ein? Man hat das Gefühl, man fährt ein Stück Vertridergeschichte, das motiviert! Ich will mir natürlich nicht die Blöße geben und kämpfe Stück für Stück, und die Lines aus der Vergangenheit gehen wieder auf.  Die Bikes bieten heute schon etwas mehr Reserve. (Obwohl die Gustav M Bremsen damals schon einen unerreichten Standard an Bremskraft auf den Trail legten). Diesmal gibt es keine Tränen.

Mein breiter 760er ‚newschool‘ Lenker bringt mich in der Monte Cas Schlucht dann aber doch an die Grenzen zwischen dem engen Geländer. Oder war es eher die nachlassende Konzentration? Auf jeden Fall eine realistische Ausrede… Roli schlüpft mit seinem fast museumsreifen, gelben HT mit 680er Lenker die wilden Kehren-Stufen runter – Respekt.

Nach drei Tagen Mountainbiken der Superlative, Essen vom Feinsten und italienischem Flair, war der Mini-Urlaub perfekt. Das schlecht angesagte Wetter zog immer in der Nacht durch, sodass der feuchte Schotter besten Grip hatte. Dafür waren die abgespeckten Steinstufen am Monte Cas eher ein Alptraum.

Ein unglücklicher Zwischenfall hat die Stimmung allerdings fast gekippt. Christoph Kovacs hat sich bei einem (relativ harmlosen) Sturz den Ellenbogen ausgekugelt…die absolut unorthopädische Stellung von Christophs hängendem Unterarm und seine schmerzverkegelten Augen waren ganz und gar nicht lustig anzuschauen, dabei war das Anschauen sicher der angenehmere Part. Aber soviel dazu, der wilde Hund hat sich den Ellenbogen selber wieder eingerenkt, ist durch den Schmerz kurz ohnmächtig geworden, aber selber nach unten gelaufen und hat nach Schmerzmittel und Bier sogar wieder halbwegs optimistisch dreingeschaut. In Innsbruck in der Klinik hat sich aber doch eine Bänder- und Knochenverletzung herausgestellt. Get well soon, Christoph, and never give up the ride!

Saisonende? Jetzt trägt das Training der Saison erst richtig ihre Früchte, soviel Routine hat man das ganze Jahr nicht, also Zeit endlich ein paar offene Projekt daheim zu knacken – im November geht oft einiges!

Ride on, Axel.

Der Fall Roland N.

Gestern um 12:54 Uhr wurde der Mountainbiker Roland N. wegen des illegalen Befahrens eines Waldsteiges vom Verwaltungsgericht Innsbruck zu einer Geldstrafe verurteilt. Dieses Urteil ist das erste seiner Art in Tirol und dürfte laut eines Artikels in der Tiroler Tageszeitung unter der Rubrik Verbrechen (http://www.tt.com/panorama/verbrechen/7423567-91/strafe-fürs-biken-im-jagdrevier.csp) “einen Stein ins Rollen gebracht haben”. Ein etwas neutralerer Artikel ist auf der ORF-online Seite zu lesen (http://tirol.orf.at/news/stories/2613360/).

Die Anzeige wurde vom Jäger und Jagdpächter des entsprechenden Jagdgebietes gemacht, was wenig verwundert. Während sich Förster und Alpenvereine um eine Lösung des Konflikts mit Mountainbikern auf Wanderwegen bemühen, ist gerade die Jägerschaft in der Vergangenheit eher durch Lobbyismus und aggressives Verhalten aufgefallen. Ein Revier ist ja schließlich da, um es zu verteidigen. Dieser Ansatz scheint ziemlich veraltet und birgt wenig Lösungspotential.

Keine Verbote, sondern gegenseitiger Respekt war im Gegensatz dazu der Konsens der Fachtagung der Alpenvereine am International Mountain Summit (IMS) vor 3 Wochen in Brixen (http://www.alpenverein.at/portal/news/aktuelle_news_kurz/2013_10_21_ims-mountainbike.php). Der Club Arc Alpin, der Dachverband der Alpenvereine, bündelt zweifellos die objektive Expertise in Sachen Naturschutz, Wegeerhaltung, alpine Sicherheit und Ausbildung und ist frei von Motiven, sich persönliche oder finanzielle Vorteile zu erhalten. Gegenseitiger Respekt ist der wohl weiseste Ansatz für ein konfliktfreies Miteinander aller Waldbenützer! Trotzdem müssen gesetzliche Änderungen folgen, die Mountainbiker aus der Rubrik Verbrecher befreien. Wenn mit dem gestrigen Urteil als statuiertes Exempel tatsächlich ein Stein ins Rollen gebracht wurde, so eher in die falsche Richtung.

Axel und das Team Vertriders.

Nachtrag zum Hammertag

Der Sommer ist in vollem Gange. Sonniges Bergwetter und Halbtagsjob erlauben reges Treiben abseits von sonntäglichem Wander-Mainstream. Tag für Tag, Tour für Tour steigen Ausdauer und Fahrtechnik. Projekte, die grundsätzlich notwendig sind um dem Alltag die Stirn zu bieten, rücken näher. Der Plan eine Hammertour, für deren Verwirklichung der letzte Sommer nicht gereicht hat.

Das Projekt steht (2500 Höhenmeter bergauf, 2500 Höhenmeter bergab), ein Föhntag folgt gewitterfreudigen Sommertagen, der Bikepartner strotzend vor Kraft und innerer Ruhe der Machbarkeit, die Anzahl der Höhenmeter verliert ihr frotzelndes Gesicht. Wir gehen an den Start.

Es folgt eine zügige erste Auffahrt, ein Aufstieg flankiert von sattem Waldgrün und blühenden Bergwiesen. Starke Föhnböen schlagen über den steingrauen, plattigen Gipfelaufbau. Gipfelrast. Der Trail ein einziger Freudentaumel, ausgesetzt, technisch, fahrbar, eine Symphonie an Spitzkehren, immer fordernd, immer anspruchsvoll. Drahtseilversicherungen unterbrechen zwischendurch den Fahrfluss, erforderen Trittsicherheit und Hand am Seil. Ein Mix aus schmalen Gratabschnitten und Latschen hinunter bis zum Talboden. Das war eine Hammerabfahrt.

Am Talboden die Klarheit, die Kraft reicht, unbezwingbare Neugier auf eine zweite Abfahrt. Das Spiel von vorne, Auffahrt, Aufstieg, Windpeitschen, dennoch anders anders. Oben Infrastruktur, ein vorgezogenes Bier bei mir, ein Apfelstrudel bei Markus. Die Signatur der zweiten Abfahrt technisch, verblockt, fehlereinfordernd. Zahlenmässig nicht endend wollende Spitzkehren fordern Konzentration und Ausdauer. Vom Trail ausgespuckt direkt auf die Asphaltstrasse dann die Genugtuung, keinen Meter Trail verschenkt zu haben.

Im Ohrensessel, eingebettet in die winterliche Szenerie, werde ich noch daran denken, gewiß. Hammertag. Hammertour.

Thanks Markus for sharing time and trail, Sylvia.

Hier der Bericht von Markus.

Glukose 2013

Die zweite Auflage des Glungezer-Kofel-Superenduro-Rennen im August mit Spaghetti à la Kathmandu, der Crème de la Crème der lokalen Szene und einer stimmungsvollen Siegerehrung in der Garage lässt sich am besten in Bildern beschreiben. Dank Benni‘s Organisation ein gelungener Event. Race on,  Euer Team Vertriders.

Filmfest.Anton

Im Mittelpunkt des 19. Filmfest in St. Anton am Arlberg stand das Frauenklettern. Ines Papert, Barbara Zangerl und Nina Caprez zeigten, dass beim Klettern nicht mehr nur die Männer die Hosen anhaben. Wir Vertrider haben gezeigt, dass das Spektrum der alpinen Sportarten durchaus um die alpine Variante des Freeride Mountainbikens erweiterbar ist. Es war uns ein Fest.

Euer Team Vertriders.

Vertriders@FilmfestStAnton_2013

Berge – Menschen – Abenteuer

Am 19. Filmfest vom 28.8. bis 31.8. in St. Anton am Arlberg präsentieren wir erstmals die Vertriders-Film-Trilogie Flow, The Line und Steep. Wir freuen uns auf euer Kommen.

Euer Team Vertriders.

Download (PDF, 1.46MB)

Weitere Informationen:
Trailer http://vimeo.com/70651242
Online Magazin filmfest_stanton_mag13 
Homepage www.filmfest-stanton.at